Diving Australia

in Barrier

Australia needs no introduction when it comes to diving as it probably has the most famous diving location on the earth called the Great Barrier Reef. The Great Barrier Reef stretches for a total of 2300km from Queensland to Papua New Guinea.

The Great Barrier Reef is not one reef but a mass of 2900 connected reefs which makes it the largest reef system in the world and is home to over 1500 fish species and 400 kinds of corals and has over 30 species of whales and dolphins.

The Reef has been a marine park since 1975 and can be divided in 4 sections, the northern area is a little visited section, the popular Cairns and central section and the southerly Capricorn section in the south. Each year almost two million visits go to the Barrier Reef and will use Cairns and Port Douglas for day trips and liveaboards.

Cairns liveaboard operates say there is a chance to see Minke whales in the cooler months of the years which are the month of June and July. As the Minkes are curious the dive boats will just anchor and wait for the whales to come.

Off the coast of Townsville is the wreck of the Yongala which was a luxury yacht that sunk in 1911, the 109m wreck ranks as one of the best dive sites in the world.

The diving extends down south into New South Wales and Victoria. Lord Howe Island located near Sydney is one of the southern most coral reefs in the world.

The waters get cooler as the further south we go and the waters of Melbourne you will find fur seals and dolphins as well as many wrecks. Around Tasmania you find the kelp forests and sponge gardens and also have taken there fair share of wrecks too.

In the western side of Australia you will find Ningaloo reef that is famous for its whale sharks, the reef is from the Coral Bay to Exmouth.

Divers looking for sometime more extreme might want look at the caves under the desert of Nullarbor Plains.

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Simon Hemmings has 1 articles online

Simon James has been diving for 15 years and is an authority in the field so take a look at this website called M2 Nocturnal Lights and SLX 300 Nocturnal led dive lights

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This article was published on 2009/06/19